Crab

Alaskan King, Dungeness, Blue Crabs just to name a few...

 

  • Alaskan waters offer 3 species of commercially available king crab; Red King Crab, Blue King Crab and Brown King Crab. The Bering Sea is where the majority of king crab is caught, however it also comes from the Norton Sound and south eastern Alaska. King crabs are among the most sought after crabs in the world and are commonly sold in top restaurants. 
  • Red King Crab – The most sought after crab in the world, Red Kings are caught in Bristol Bay and the Norton Sound. Every year hundreds of boats set out to catch their share of this prized crab during the extremely short harvest season which commonly lasts less than 1 week. During this short time upwards of 10 million pounds are caught to quench the world’s appetite for this Alaskan delicacy for another year
  • Blue King Crab – This species is known for its giant claws is among the largest in the world. Caught in the waters off St. Matthew Island and the Pribilof Islands, blue king crab are brown with blue overtones when caught. When cooked they turn bright orange and are often sold as red king crab for this reason. Blue king crabs taste very similar to their red cousins and are an absolute delight to enjoy with friends and family.
  • Brown King Crab (Sold as Golden King) – The smaller cousins of red and blue king crab, golden kings are caught off the Aleutian chain. Their taste is also very similar to their relatives and not to be overlooked due to their smaller size. Because of their size, brown kings are usually cheaper than red or blue.
  • Dungeness crab which can be found all along the west coast of north America got it’s name from the former town of Dungeness, Washington where it was first commercially harvested. It is the most popular Pacific crab and usually weighs 1.5 to 3 pounds. Its meat has a sweet, mild nutty taste and is very tender.
  • Blue crabs, widely called Maryland crabs are the most abundant species of crab found on the US east coast. They have beautiful bluish green coloring that turns red when they are cooked and you can find them 4 inches to 6 inches and larger.  Although most are consumed as hard shell crabs, if they are caught just after molting they can be eaten unpeeled as soft shell crabs.